Chinese Restaurant Tea – What Teas Are Served In Chinese Restaurants?

Many Americans find themselves greatly enjoying the tea served in Chinese restaurants. Because China has a much richer and more active tea culture than the United States, the teas served in Chinese restaurants can tend to be a several notches up in quality from those that a typical American is used to drinking. Furthermore, for historical reasons, most of the mainstream tea in the U.S. originates in the British tradition, focusing on black teas like Ceylon, Darjeeling, Assam, and Earl Grey. The teas served in Chinese restaurants are typically quite different, and often represent some people’s first exposure to the styles and varieties that are more commonly consumed in China and throughout southeast Asia.

What types of tea are served in Chinese restaurants?

There is no single standard type of tea that is served in Chinese restaurants; rather, a number of different varieties are regularly served in this setting. In the typical mainstream American Chinese restaurants, the most common teas served are oolong and Jasmine tea. Green tea is sometimes served, as is Pu-erh. One brand of tea, Dynasty, actually markets a Chinese restaurant tea, which is a blend of oolong, jasmine, and green teas, reflecting a fusion of the different styles of tea most frequently served in Chinese restaurants.

Cantonese restaurants, such as those serving dim sum (numerous small dishes, often involving dumplings, served a la carte), and many of the restaurants common in the Chinatowns of large cities like New York, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, often serve Pu-erh tea, or a blend of Pu-erh with chrysanthemum flowers. In reference to this phenomenon, one brand of tea, Foojoy, sells Chrysanthemum Pu-erh under the name “Dim Sum Bo Nay Tea”.

Choosing oolong, pu-erh, jasmine, and other teas:

Although some restaurants do use tea bags, many use loose-leaf tea, and the best teas are generally only available in loose-leaf form. If you are lucky enough to live near a specialty loose-leaf tea store, or an Asian store with a good selection of loose tea, this may be a good option. However, most Americans do not have this luxury, and must resort to buying from an online retailer. Buying tea online, where you do not have the opportunity to see or smell the leaf, can be a bit intimidating if you are not familiar with the different varieties of tea. A little background information can go a long way towards knowing what to buy.

Oolong, also sometimes spelled “wu long” is a partially-oxidized tea, intermediate between green and black teas. Many oolongs served in Chinese restaurants are roasted fairly strongly, giving them a dark color and a roasted aroma. Jasmine tea is a floral-scented tea, made by mixing tea leaves (usually of green or pouchong tea) with jasmine flowers. It has a strong floral aroma, often described as perfumy. Chinese green tea is very diverse, but most of it is pan-fired, giving it a toastier quality than Japanese greens; some Chinese green tea has a mild smoky aroma, as the tea is pan-fired in woks heated by wood fires. Pu-erh tea is a post-fermented tea, meaning that it is often aged and improves with age. Pu-erh has an earthy aroma and smooth flavor which blends well with Chrysanthemum flowers.

In summary:

There is no one type of tea that is universally served in Chinese restaurants in the United States; however, oolong, jasmine, Chinese green tea, and Pu-erh are common kinds that are served, with Chrysanthemum Pu-erh being especially common in Cantonese restaurants serving dim sum. The best way to purchase any of these teas is to buy them in loose-leaf form. For people not able to find them in a local shop, these varieties of tea are all available through online retailers.

Best Way to Get Your “Chopsticks” on Chinese Restaurant Supplies

In the Chinese culture, food has always been one of the most important aspects. Like the old saying goes, “Food is the first necessity of the people.” The Chinese have a strong belief in this saying, in fact, the usual greeting between two friends when meeting tends to be “Have you eaten?” rather than “How are you?” Literally everywhere in China, you can easily spot Chinese restaurants and food kiosks regardless if the town is big or small. In actual fact, Chinese restaurants are commonly found in cities all over the world. People from around the world, with different ethnic backgrounds, have learned to appreciate the Chinese culture and their delicious yet nutritious foods.

With that said, opening up a Chinese restaurant can be very lucrative. However, competition will be fierce. Just like in China, you’ll probably find a Chinese restaurant just around the corner from where you live (no matter where your location is…I bet!). It will be difficult to open and actually survive against the current odds that are not in your favor. However, that’s all going to change once I reveal your competitive advantage. It’s quite simple actually. You need to find the perfect online Chinese restaurant supplier.

So many restaurant owners today are not web savvy and are very traditional. Repeatedly, they have been going to the same vendors for all their supplies and equipment without even considering a more cost effective solution. Granted, the owner might be getting great deals and plus the trust and loyal factor plays in. But it is almost a guarantee you will find a wider array of products, even better products at unbeatable prices online. As a restaurant owner, it is your responsibility to promote productivity and improve profit margins on a consistent basis. Relying on steady sales and repeat customers will not secure your job. You need to cut expenses and find better solutions for your restaurant needs. Searching online for your restaurant supplier will do the trick.

Also keep in mind, there might be cases where the “trustworthy” vendors take advantage of their loyal customer and charge more. This is not a rare occasion; I’ve seen this happen plenty of times. It’s sad to say, but a lot of vendors do take advantage of their customers. Truth be told, I’m not going to be right in all cases. To ensure all fairness, you could use the web to do some research on your current products and their prices, which is another great reason on why you should use online Chinese restaurant suppliers.

Starting up a Chinese restaurant can be a weary task. Where would you find the right products and equipment that fits best with your offering? Finding Chinese food products and equipment can be a daunting task for anyone without the web at their disposal. Another plus side about choosing a supplier online is you can find niche suppliers, in this case, a Chinese restaurant supplier, without the hassle of flipping pages, scrimmaging with papers and contact numbers. You can easily filter out and narrow your search simply by typing down your search query on a major search engine and let it do all the work. Hit enter, then PRESTO! You’ll have the list before your very own eyes.

Choosing Healthy Dishes When Ordering From a Chinese Restaurant

If you are a lover of Chinese food, then you probably know what a real Chinese dish tastes like. An honest-to-goodness authentic Chinese dish would have a lot of vegetables. These dishes are often cooked with little or no oil. This is why this particular cuisine is perfect if you are trying to lose weight. You really can go on an all-Chinese diet! That is, of course, if you opt for the real thing. This is not the case, however, with the usual restaurants. You would often end up with greasy and fatty poor excuse for Chinese food. Now, if that is the case, you have four options available to you.

First, you can choose to fly to China and stay there until you lose weight. If that sounds ridiculous, you can always look for a Chinese family and befriend them which is your second option. Of course, it’d be embarrassing to visit only during meal times. Thirdly, you can choose to learn how to cook real Chinese cuisine yourself. Lastly, you can choose your Chinese restaurant and orders well.

The last option is probably the most feasible one. After all, you can’t afford to fly to China. You can’t force yourself on any Chinese family. You don’t have the time to learn and cook the cuisine. So, finding a good restaurant and learning how to choose your orders well is probably the best choice.

Now, here are some tips on how to go about choosing the best low-calorie meals whenever you eat in a Chinese restaurant.

Egg rolls and spareribs are probably your first choice if you are going to buy Chinese food. However, these are bad choices if you are thinking about your health and your weight. These are just two of the things that you should avoid. Instead of getting egg rolls, get a wonton soup instead. This will suit your low-calorie diet better.

When buying main course dishes, you should choose dishes that have been steamed. They are healthier for you. Get yourself steamed spring rolls, chop suey or moo-goo gai pan. Anything that is steamed or boiled is a good choice. Avoid things that have been fried, and stay away from dishes that are way too salty, fatty and oily.

You don’t have to avoid eating at a Chinese restaurant altogether. You just have to learn how to choose your dishes well, so that you will still be able to enjoy your favorite Asian cuisine.

[Chinese Restaurant Review] Foo Kee Seafood Restaurant, Flushing

When is a “B” the second best score that you can get? When it comes to Foo Kee Seafood Restaurant! As in achieving the second highest rating ever accorded by The Chinese Quest that is! For the other reason that you could score a “B”, you’ll just have to check out our Twitter feed, @TheChineseQuest.

After a two month hiatus, in the winter that seemingly will never end in the New York City Metropolitan area, the Mee’s hit the road again this evening. Taking special note of Mee Tsu Yan’s delicate intestinal fortitude, or lack thereof at this time, we purposely chose a Chinese restaurant of the Cantonese variety.

Once again search of the best Chinese restaurant around we ventured forth again across the Nassau border in to Flushing, NY. At this point we must consider rating Flushing restaurants on a separate scale than Long Island restaurants as is becoming evident that Flushing restaurants are now occupying four of the top five spots on our Quest to find the best Chinese restaurant on all of, umm, Long Island.

Our destination was:

Foo Kee Seafood Restaurant

136-14 38th Avenue

Flushing, NY 11354

Our special guest this evening was the most honorable Mee Har Vee, a world renowned wine connoisseur, or sommelier, a bon vivant, and an all around nice guy. A real mensch, if ever we met one. A character. And boy do we know characters!

Darren was our host. I swear the guy could have been in vaudeville! And what better way to strike a chord with a Jew than being funny and personable. We were in for a real treat (which sure put, the “B” rating that the Board of Health slapped on the restaurant, our minds at ease).

We left ALL of the ordering to him… and we left the wine selection to Mee Har Vee… more on that later.

When Darren (we’re not really sure if that’s his real name or a stage name) brought out three appetizers that included our staple of spare ribs (so so), crispy peking duck (yum-Mee), and a crispy chicken dish, our meal got off to a great start.

It was accompanied by Mee Har Vee’s first of five wine selections, called “Seven Daughters”. Now being that we were six guys, we were a little confused. What was the extra daughter doing at our table? Then he explained the Seven daughters represented the seven different grapes that were blended in to making this most delicious white wine. There were four other wines served. Beats me what they were called. By then I was… umm, back to the review.

So, after the appetizers settled nicely in to our bellies it was time for Darren (that was his name, right?) to recommend our entrees. There were four or five spectacular choices served with some incredible sauces. Nothing spicy. But, very succulent.

My favorite was the five pound lobster in garlic and ginger sauce.

There was some steak cube (kew?)… melted in your mouth. Scallops that were like butter. Another chicken dish, and house special fried rice.

Being a true, authentic, Chinese Restaurant, there was no fortune cookies served for desert (so sorry, you’ll have to pick your lotto numbers from some other place), but the sweetest juiciest oranges I’ve had in a long long time.

There are literally hundreds of Chinese restaurants that you could go to in Flushing. This is one that you surely don’t want to miss.

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

-Lonnie Goldman aka Mee Magnum (“Chop! Chop!”)